How to Remove Engine Deposits

The tools you'll need depend on which area of the engine you're looking to remove the engine deposits from.

Removing engine deposits may involve nothing more than pouring an additive into your gas tank or it may involve manually cleaning some parts on your engine. The tools you’ll need depend on which area of the engine you’re looking to remove the engine deposits from.
Most of the time, an engine deposit additive can be used to clean out areas of the engine such as the fuel injector ports, intake valves and the combustion chamber. Fuel injector ports have an opening that’s about the size of a human hair, so even a clog of only ten percent can induce stalling, engine hesitation or loss of power. Combustion chamber deposits can raise the octane requirement of the engine and even cause premature fuel detonation, both of which will cost you more money in gas. Intake valve deposits can cause hesitation and stalling. To take care of all of these internal deposits all you’ll need is a bottle of engine deposit additive. Many of the additive formulas you’ll find at an auto repair store will take care of several issues like cleaning the carburetor or fuel injector deposits and intake valve deposits all at the same time

Cleaning Out Engine Deposits

Cleaning out the deepest areas of your car's engine with an additive is the quickest and easiest way to remove engine deposits.

Like we mentioned on the last page, cleaning out the deepest areas of your car’s engine with an additive is the quickest and easiest way to remove engine deposits. Using the product is as simple as going to the store, picking up the type of cleaner you want and then following the instructions on the label. Additives will vary based on the type of engine, what they’re cleaning and how often they should be used. Just make sure you follow the instructions properly.
But if you’re planning to clean out engine deposits from the throttle body, prepare to get your hands dirty. You’ll need to remove the emissions hoses, intake air hose, sensor wires and anything else connected to your car’s air intake. Once the throttle body is exposed it’s best not to run the engine. Firing your engine at this point may set off trouble codes from the sensors and require your engine to go through all the necessary checks to correct the conditions when you run the engine the next time

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